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Interview with Nick Campbell - Narcissus Arts

This month we’re all about Art. If like us, you’re a little wary of terms like ‘abstract impressionism’ and ‘existential experientialism’ here’s a no nonsense round up from industry insider and friend of Hamilton and Hare Nick Campbell from Narcissus Arts. 
Hamilton and Hare | The Journal | Narcissus Arts
Tell us about Narcissus Arts?
Narcissus Arts is a bespoke contemporary art consultancy which specialises in sourcing high end art for limited budgets, generally under £10,000. Even though there are other avenues that specialise in providing a market place for affordable art, either online or say at a fair, Narcissus Arts is the only consultancy in the UK to offer this insight and expertise at this level of the market. After being established over 4 years ago we have grown to not only source artwork for private individuals either looking to spend their bonus, or to fill the walls of the property they recently purchased, but to working with major interior designers and developers helping them buy affordable art for restaurants, hotels, offices and residential developments.
We’ve just had Frieze London – what were your highlights?
My personal highlight was a new body of large works by the very exciting Italian artist Alek O. Setting aside the interesting but astronomically priced pieces, other works that caught my eye were the wonderfully minimalist and whimsical paintings by Thilo Heinzman and the amazingly intricate and beautiful ribbon works on paper by Nicholas Hlobo.

What would be your best advice for someone looking to make their first proper art purchase?
Buy something that you love and that you can see yourself living with. Often people are swayed by hype or possible financial gain but at the end of the day if you can’t live with it then don’t buy it.
What’s your opinion on the current London art scene? What does the future hold?
London’s art scene is without doubt one of the top two global art market places and there is no sign of that changing. On one end of the spectrum London is still seeing major international galleries opening up new spaces, such as New York giant Marian Goodman, who would not be attracted here unless the art scene was not still very vibrant. On the lower end of the spectrum we have fantastic art schools throughout the capital who are producing world class artists, some of whom are very quickly gaining an international following soon after they graduate. However my main fear for the future is how London is becoming increasingly hard for young artists to live and work in and as a result, these artists might look to move and work elsewhere, such as Los Angeles or Berlin, as rates and general living is considerably cheaper.

What’s your pick of upcoming exhibitions?
A group show at Limoncello Gallery opening here in London in November will include some interesting young talent and possibly some great buying opportunities. Brent Waden's new solo show opening at Perez Projects in Berlin promises to be very exciting. And lastly, the sculptures have already been installed, but I would love to see Danh Vo's public sculpture in New York. Throughout the city Vo has installed a number of copper sculptures from parts of the Statue of Liberty.
 Give us a typical day in the life of Nicholas Campbell? 
When I leave the house, I walk next door and fortunately I am immediately at my desk. After indulging in my immediate guilty pleasure, the Daily Mail, I check all of the art news websites to make sure that I am up to date with what is going on worldwide. I then will probably spend the rest of the morning chasing up artists or clients and putting together presentations for upcoming projects. In the afternoons I often get out and about meeting with galleries and artists, building up my network and knowledge. The artworld is rather a nocturnal industry so there is almost always at least one gallery or museum opening or talk to attend in the evenings.
What are your go to key style items?
When not wearing a suit I opt for a blazer of some sort, currently a blue Herringbone from Canali, a cashmere scarf, simple shirt, fitted black or blue jeans and chelsea boots.
 If there was a fire, what 3 things from your wardrobe would you save?
My Hamilton and Hare boxer shorts (obviously), my cashmere overcoat and the Lobb Chelsea Boots.

In the market for some art but don't have the time or resources to find what your looking for? For some professional advice email Nick@narcissusarts.com or check out his daily postings on Instagram to find out what's caught his eye recently.
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